ASTRONOMY COLLECTION

Noble Planetarium Foyer

There’s plenty to see even before you enter the Noble Planetarium’s digital dome. Outside in the queuing area is a collection of some of the Museum’s most significant astronomical possessions, including:

  • The Spitz A-1 Starball, the original planetarium projector starball used by Miss Charlie Mary Noble in a canvas tent in the backyard of the original Fort Worth Children’s Museum in the early 1950s.

  • A Sputnik satellite model like that launched on October 4, 1957, one of only two dozen such spacecraft manufactured by the Soviet Union in the mid 1950s.

  • A Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU), a propulsion system used by U.S. astronauts during Space Shuttle missions in 1984.

  • A 100-pound iron meteorite found in Blue Mound in 1979. Named the Blue Mound meteorite, it was tracked by radar through the Earth’s atmosphere in 1964, but remained elusive for 15 years.

Also included is information about Charlie Mary Noble, the namesake for the Noble Planetarium, and Oscar Monnig, one of Fort Worth’s most prominent amateur astronomers and meteorite hunters.


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Outside in the Noble Planetarium queuing area is a collection of some of the Museum’s most significant astronomical possessions.
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Fun Fact
A typical large format (aka IMAX) 45-minute film costs about 6 million dollars to make.

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