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SPECIAL WORKSHOP SERIES CONTINUES ON AUGUST 27th!

AUTISM TRAINING SERIES FOR PARENTS, TEACHERS, PROFESSIONALS,AND OTHERS INTERESTED IN LEARNING MORE ABOUT ASD

10:15 - 11:15 AM

 School management skills and what to know about the IEP process


11:30 - 1 PM

Can your listening environment influence your spatial task performance? How does music impact heart rate?

Many people listen to music or watch TV while they work or study.  Does the music help them do better work?  Some researchers argue that auditory input helps a person ignore distractions around him or that the “digital generation” requires multiple stimuli to stay focused.  Other scientists claim that music is a distraction that lowers the quality of work.

The purpose of these studies is to explore the impact of the listening environment during a simple mental task.  Participants will complete a simple spatial task or have their heart rate measured during four different auditory conditions:  silence, white noise, and two different musical selections.  Results will be compared between conditions, and each participant will be able to determine if the listening environment has affected his/her own task performance.

This study is a collaboration between the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History and Dr. Lin Lin, University of North Texas.  


1 to 4 PM

  Exploring virutal reality through Google cardboard

 This study is a collaboration between the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History and Mike Schellen, University of North Texas. 


COMING IN SEPTEMBER!

What makes kids eat?

Have you ever wondered why you eat the foods you eat?

This study will look at hunger and children’s preferences for different snack foods. Children will taste some snacks, report how much they like them, and then answer some questions about themselves and their hunger. Parents will also complete questionnaires about their child and their child’s food preferences.

We are interested in learning about influences upon eating. We hope to better understand how and when children develop eating behaviors that we see in adulthood. 

This study is a collaboration between Randi Proffitt Leyva & Sarah Hill, Texas Christian University (r.proffittleyva@tcu.edu ), and the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History.


SEPTEMBER 10

Calm mind. calm body?

Have you ever noticed that when you are calm, you are better at paying attention and feel happier? Research shows that calming the mind through practices like mindfulness leads to better self-control and feelings of joy.

This study will examine the impact of mindfulness on children. Mindfulness means paying attention to the present moment. Children will listen to a guided recording that instructs them to pay attention to their breath and body. They will wear noise-cancelling headphones during the recording. Before and after, children will tell us how they are feeling. During the entire session, children will wear a wristband that provides information on how fast the heart is beating and the sweat coming from their skin. This information helps researchers determine how relaxed and engaged children are during the recording.
This study is a collaboration between Dr. Catherine Spann, University of Texas at Arlington (caspann@uta.edu ), and the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History.

Have you ever noticed that when you are calm, you are better at paying attention and feel happier? Research shows that calming the mind through practices like mindfulness leads to better self-control and feelings of joy.
This study will examine the impact of mindfulness on children. Mindfulness means paying attention to the present moment. Children will listen to a guided recording that instructs them to pay attention to their breath and body. They will wear noise-cancelling headphones during the recording. Before and after, children will tell us how they are feeling. During the entire session, children will wear a wristband that provides information on how fast the heart is beating and the sweat coming from their skin. This information helps researchers determine how relaxed and engaged children are during the recording.

This study is a collaboration between Dr. Catherine Spann, University of Texas at Arlington (caspann@uta.edu ), and the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History. 


 

 

 

Fun Fact
When established in 1941, the Museum was the first children's museum in Texas and one of the first children's museums in the nation.

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